CRO Tricks of The Trade

Why You Should Embrace Transparency Marketing

Various studies have estimated the average consumer sees anywhere from 3,000 to 20,000 marketing messages each day. Of course, most of these go unnoticed. One possible reason? People are increasingly tuning out inauthentic and blatant marketing attempts.

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CRO Tricks of The Trade

7 Proven Ways to Improve Website Readability and Boost Conversions

Here’s the thing: nobody reads copy. With the human attention span becoming less than that of a goldfish (eight seconds against nine), writing an engaging copy is a challenging task. According to past research published by Nielsen Norman Group, 79% users scan any new page they come across and only 16% read word by word. The same holds true today, with users finding time to read only 28% of the copy on an average visit.

The post 7 Proven Ways to Improve Website Readability and Boost Conversions appeared first on VWO Blog .

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CRO Tricks of The Trade

3 Landing Page Best Practices Debunked

You’ve heard it all before when it comes to creating high-performing landing pages: “Write engaging copy!” “Get your value proposition right!” and the list goes on.

All of these “best practices” can become obvious, and you see everyone writing about them. So have you ever asked yourself, What if these best practices aren’t true? What if they’re actually hurting my landing page conversion rates?

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CRO Tricks of The Trade

What Are Heat Maps Good For (Besides Looking Cool)?

Heat maps are a popular conversion optimization tool, but what good are they really? It’s easy to say that they help you to see what users are doing on your site. Sure, of course – but lots of other methods do that too, and perhaps with greater accuracy. So how are heat maps useful in the pursuit of higher conversion rates?

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CRO Tricks of The Trade

Small changes, big LIFT

Did you ever wonder where that phrase came from?

Steve Jobs? Yoda?

Turns out, nRobert Browning first penned those words in the 19th century, in a poem inspiring minimalist designers to push the limits of simplicity.

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